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Get Kids Access To Dental Care

(NAPS)—Here’s something many parents may be surprised to learn: tooth decay is the most common preventable chronic disease among children in the United States.The ProblemIf left untreated, it can hurt more than your kid’s mouth. Your child’s physical and social development—as well as his or her school performance—can also be affected. More than 51 million school hours are lost each year due to dental-related illness. Kids with healthy teeth have fewer sick days and less distractions from learning.The Good NewsParents may be surprised to find that getting their child’s teeth checked is easier and less expensive than they think. Under Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), essential health care services like preventative care and dental health are covered. For more than 20 years, CHIP has been instrumental in reducing the number of uninsured children to historic lows. Medicaid and CHIP cover more than one-third of all children in the U.S. and have helped insure 95 percent of the nation’s children—an estimated 35.5 million currently are covered.How It WorksDental coverage includes access to regular check-ups, x-rays, fluoride treatments, dental sealants, fillings and more.Parents can look online to see whether their children are eligible. In most states, children and teens up to age 19 can enroll. Depending on income, many families qualify for free or low-cost health coverage. In general, children and teens in a family of four earning up to $50,000 a year—and in some places more—may qualify for Medicaid and CHIP.Children and teens can stay covered for as long as they qualify. Families can enroll at any time of the year, but need to renew coverage each year.More Good NewsEven if your application for Medicaid and CHIP has been denied before, you and your children may now be eligible. Parents may qualify for Medicaid as well, but you don’t have to be eligible for your child to get coverage.Who Can HelpMore kids can be covered with the help of Medicaid and CHIP. With that as the goal, the Connecting Kids to Coverage National Campaign, a national outreach and enrollment initiative, informs families with children and teens about Medicaid and CHIP eligibility. Families enroll through their states. Call 1-877-KIDS-NOW or visit InsureKidsNow.gov to be connected to program offices in your state.Learn MoreFor more information and to see eligibility requirements, visit www.InsureKidsNow.gov.

  • icon Updated: February 15

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Thursday 02/13/2020
If You’re Feeling Down, You’re Not Alone. It’s That Time of Year
Updated: February 15, 2020 - 2:51 am

(NAPS)—You may have heard the terms—winter blues, Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD), Depressive Disorder with a Seasonal Pattern. No matter what you call it, with approximately 17.3 million adults in the U.S. experiencing seasonal depression, according to the National Institute of Mental Health, feeling gloomy this time of year isn’t uncommon—but it can be overcome.

The Problem

Depressive Disorder with a Seasonal Pattern (formerly called SAD) can affect anyone of any age. Whether you’re a student returning to class, a busy working professional who’s always playing catchup, or even newly retired with found time on your hands, the excitement of the holidays is long over and wintry dark days are here. While January and February are the typical peak months for the disorder, symptoms can persist through April, according to Mental Health America.

Doctor’s Advice

When that feeling of sadness persists for several weeks, it’s time to take action, according to Dr. Desreen Dudley, a licensed Clinical Psychologist and Behavioral Health Provider of Therapeutic Services for Teladoc Health. But, she points out, often the toughest thing for many is how to discern whether what they feel is temporary or something more serious.

“If someone has a few days of feeling low, that’s normal and typically nothing to worry about. It’s when the feeling lingers for weeks and people lose interest in daily activities and suffer persistent negative thoughts, that lend a stronger basis for Depressive Disorder with a Seasonal Affective Pattern diagnosis,” she says.

What To Watch For

Other symptoms she warns about are:

•Change in appetite

•Change in sleep pattern

•Decreased energy

•Decreased concentration

•Feelings of worthlessness or guilt

•An inability to think, concentrate, or finish tasks at work or school

•Thinking about suicide, self-harm, or death

Dr. Dudley contends individuals already struggling with depressive disorders are susceptible to SAD patterns. For older Americans, a Vitamin D deficiency can exacerbate low moods. On the other end of the spectrum, she has worked with newly independent college students who find SAD a heavy burden and say their new responsibilities of classes, exams and jobs can compound their depression. For some, not rising as early for classes as they did in high school means sleeping in more and further limiting their exposure to sunlight.

What To Do

In addition to considering therapy, such as virtual care, which is available on your terms and from any location you choose, Dr. Dudley recommends:

•Avoiding or cutting back on alcohol and other addictive substances

•Eating healthfully—more lean proteins, fruits and vegetables, and eliminating sugar

•Daily exercise at least 30 minute a day (walking counts)

•Yoga or meditation

•Learning about and trying light therapy

•Regularly surrounding yourself with those you enjoy being around.

When To Seek Help

According to a recent global study conducted by Ipsos MORI for Teladoc Health, individuals often recognize when they’re struggling, but even so, over a third of the respondents who have had one mental health episode admitted to not seeking professional help. The reason? For many, it’s often the difficulty in finding mental health care.

“Thankfully, virtual care is becoming increasingly available as a source of convenient mental health care,” Dr. Dudley says. “It eliminates the traditional obstacles of in-person visits and has opened up access for anyone with a busy schedule, individuals who may have difficulty getting out of the house and students who may fear the stigma of walking into the campus mental health clinic.”

Learn More 

For further information, visit www.Teladoc.com/therapy.

Put Health at the Top of your To-Do List
Updated: February 18, 2020 - 2:37 am

(BPT) - The last few months of the year are known for filling up with tasks and, as a result, it is not uncommon for self-care to fall to the bottom of the list.

Save Time with Easy Meal Hacks
Posted: February 13, 2020

(Family Features) If it feels as though your life is too busy, you're not alone. Many families experience the feeling of constant busyness, but there are ways to save time around the house and lift some of those burdens.

Smart Saving Strategies
Updated: February 17, 2020 - 2:55 am

(Family Features) Money management and building long-term financial health is a careful balancing act between long- and short-term financial needs, and now is a perfect opportunity to re-examine your goals. People sometimes focus on short-term needs, making sure they can cover routine bills and living essentials. However, many Americans do not have the resources to cover an unexpected expense, much less save for the future.

The Cost of Living with IBD
Posted: February 13, 2020

(Family Features) A diagnosis like inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) means lifestyle changes throughout every aspect of life, including financially. IBD has many direct costs of care, like clinic visits, radiology studies, procedures and medications. There are also indirect costs such as missed work or school. 

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